Conferințele de Vară de la Telciu

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        From Decolonizing Modernization towards Modernifying the Rural – by Ion Matei Costinescu    

    Conf-Telciu-2015-84

photo credit: Luca C. Cosma

This summer’s 4th Annual Telciu Summer Conference was titled “Beyond East and West: Decolonizing Modernization” and took place June 24-25, 2015. Although the tradition of hosting international academic conferences is an already established tradition in the Transylvanian village of Telciu, this year’s was the first in a planned series of symposia that propose to examine modernity in its various historical hypostases and global iterations. In a manner consonant with the location, next year’s conference will focus on the intertwined themes of “rurality and modernity”. The call for papers, as well as details about a summer school on the same theme designed primarily for undergraduate students, will be publicized at an appropriate time.

Taking as a point of departure the need to explicate the power/knowledge mechanisms which frame understandings of “modernity” and configure uneven processes of socio-economic modernization, the papers presented this summer encompassed a variety of distinct yet complementary perspectives. These ranged from analyses that focused on the historical and epistemic (re)construction of colonial-type mechanisms and systems to investigations that highlighted the social hierarchies and structural violence inherent in the colonial matrix of power. The latter approach presupposed that this matrix persisted, albeit in modified forms, even after the end of formal colonial rule.

Considerations of space preclude describing the more than 20 contributions organized around thematic panels. What follows, therefore, is a critical précis and rejoinder to some of the papers presented. These contributions were not selected based on their perceived superior merits, but according to this writer’s academic interests. It is worth nothing, however, that the conference’s overall intellectual level was good though of course not always consistent. These inconsistencies, I would argue, are in themselves revealing, illustrating both the strengths and potential pitfalls inherent in theoretical approaches favoured by the participants. The latter point became evident both in the course of the individual presentations and during the ensuing lively and multi-vocal debates. Consequently, a good place to start our review is Ovidiu Ţichindelean’s keynote address and, which was titled “A Case for Decolonial Romania and Europe”. Therein he outlined the key features of decolonial theory – already sketched in the paragraph above – and worked through some of its practical implications for doing scholarship in and about the above-mentioned geographical areas.

One of the key points that emerged is that Europe was the centre for a variety of imperial systems, each with its own distinct features and systems of domination. The histories of Central and Southeaster Europe, in particular, were shaped by multiple imperial legacies, which certainly included the application of Soviet-like models of social modernization. This poses significant challenges for researchers interested in applying the insights provided by postcolonial and subaltern studies to the regions in question. This is because these bodies of scholarship were developed in order to account for the experience of British colonialism and its successor states and, to a somewhat lesser extent, the history of Latin America. A wholesale and non-reflexive application of this theoretical corpus to different historical and socio-cultural contexts would be decidedly unhelpful, no matter how well developed this body of theory might be. A brief example suffices in order to illustrate this observation. Until the series of 19th century westernizing reforms, Ottoman power/knowledge was quite different than its occidental counterparts. More specifically, there was no rule of colonial difference predicated on western notions of race since Ottoman social and political identities tended to be more fluid. Nonetheless, the analytical focus on the ways in which modernity is negotiated in various socio-cultural contexts, as well as the interdisciplinary concern with the social and political inequalities that configure subject-making and subject agency, make for potentially fruitful intersections between “Europe” as a unit of analysis and the above-mentioned theoretical corpus.

Accordingly, Norbert Petrovici analyzed the ways in which scholars from both the West and the East constructed the epistemic framework for analysing the post-socialist transition in Central and Eastern Europe. The thesis of this sophisticated though occasionally dense paper, titled “Framing Criticism and Knowledge Production in Semi-peripheries: Postsocialism Unpacked” was that the elaboration of a sharp dichotomy between socialism and post-socialism transformed the region into an epistemic enclave. The “self-orientalizing narratives” produced by the CEE scholars, Petrovici further contended, helped them forge alliances with academics based in the West. These alliances were predicated on taking the “East out of the normal flow of history” and in this way (re)produced asymmetries between the core and its academic peripheries.

On its part, Veda Popovici’s and Ovidiu Pop’s “The Postponed Belonging. A short history of the awareness of the periphery and the desire for Europe in the national Romanian construct” offered a complementary analysis to Petrovici’s by focusing on the perception of a temporal lag between Romania and Western Europe. The awareness of being part of the European periphery, they argued, was internalized by Romanian nationalist elites and thus became a central motif of Romanian national identity. There is much to be said about this paper, whose principal merit was to suggest new and stimulating lines of inquiry into the structure of Romanian nationalism. At the same time, the presentation was vigorously critiqued, mostly by this writer but also by others, for its lack of attention to specific historical contexts, as well for its insufficiently reflexive application of decolonial theory. It is all very well, the critique went, to highlight in one fell swoop what might be termed the “double consciousness”  (sicut W.E.B. Du Bois) exhibited by the 1848 revolutionary ethos, the Junimist critique of forms without substance, the interwar national ontologies linked to fascism, Ceauşescu’s ethno-nationalism, as well as the “non-critical Europeanism” of the post-socialist period. But is worth bearing in mind each of these ideological projects elaborated its own distinct sense temporality. In order to avoid the risk of essentializing Romanian nationalism, these temporalities would need to be elucidated by doing conceptual history in the classic and therefore rigorous sense of the term. At the time the paper was presented and defended there was no evidence that the authors contemplated such an approach.

By contrast, Emanuel Copilaş presented a balanced and nuanced analysis whose theme was “National-communism for Export: Ceauşescu’s Romania, the Third World and the ‘New World Order’”. Eschewing ritualistic condemnations of national communism, whose repressive aspects were taken as self-evident, Copilaş framed the regime’s tier-mondisme both as a means to consolidate its dissidence from Moscow and as a move to assert global influence by offering a model of socio-economic modernization suitable for adoption by other developing countries. Had Copilaş more explicitly linked Ceauşescu’s ideological tiermondisme with the practical aspects of his internal model of “multilateral socialist development”, he would have articulated an even stronger analysis. After all, much of the nuts and bolts of his foreign policy involved securing natural resources for the nascent Romanian petrochemical industry and lucrative markets for Romanian industrial products (including arms).

Finally, there was a series of papers which fit well in this year’s theme and also anticipate next year’s focus on the rural world. Alina Branda’s fine presentation, titled “Beyond East and West, Anthropology as Intercultural Dialogue”, detailed the re-articulation of anthropological discourse in response to the global process of decolonization which already was fully underway by the late 1960s. Branda argued that a similar process of reconfiguring social-scientific concepts and goals by means of cross-cultural fertilization took place in interwar Romania, as exemplified by the Bucharest Sociological School. The theoretical and empirical apparatus of the Gustian School, which it developed in its quest to bring about a thoroughgoing social modernization of the Romanian village, was just such an example of intercultural dialogue. It was, on the one hand, influenced by the intellectually dominant German and French sciences of the nation. On the other hand, monographic sociology evolved both in response to the conditions of life in the Romanian countryside and as part of the Gustian strategy to position sociology as the pre-eminent science of the Romanian nation by rendering other social scientific disciplines ancillary to the monographic endeavor.

Although Branda’s wide-ranging, interdisciplinary investigation may be taken as an example of solid scholarship, this writer would have liked to see her analysis more firmly anchored in the twin processes of post-imperial disentanglement and state-building unfolding throughout interwar Southeastern Europe. I would therefore suggest that the Gustians spearheaded the national integration of the rural world by employing methods commonly associated with project of internal colonialism. Indeed, the Gustian project of state consolidation exhibits remarkable affinities to those undertaken in interbellic Czechoslovakia. This was made abundantly clear by Pavel Baloun’s and Filip Herza’s papers, respectively titled “‘Civilizing the Gypsy Child’: ‘Gypsy School’ as a Colonial Practice in Interwar Czechoslovakia’(1918-1938) and “Orientalism and the Discourses of Modernization: Czech Anthropology in Subcarpathian Ruthenia (1919-1938)”. These papers analyzed various modalities whereby internal peripheries and subaltern social identities were hierarchically malintegrated into the newly-created Czechoslovak state. In their own way, both authors showed that the period’s dominant discourses of modernization conceived of state consolidation as a mission to civilize the rural hinterlands, which were in themselves ranked according to their perceived degree of “backwardness”. In turn, this symbolic geography framed modernization experiments undertaken along both educational and eugenic lines.

In this way, Branda, Baloun, and Herza demonstrated how contemporary social theory can be combined not only with social history undertaken at the grass roots level, but also with more traditional forms of intellectual and political history in order develop compelling new approaches  towards understanding the “rural”. There is indeed a great need for such investigations. For, to borrow a phrase aptly coined by a colleague of mine, much of the rural world remains a terra incognita – not least in conceptual terms.

This summary would not be complete without acknowledging the hard work undertaken by the organizing committee composed of Valer Simion Cosma and Manuela Boatcă. Their efforts went a long way towards insuring the success of this conference. Special thanks are due to the Mayoralty of Telciu and to the “George Coşbuc” Bistriţa County Library for their generous financial and logistical support. The Faculty of History and Philosophy and the Seminar for Historical Anthropology at Babeş-Bolyai University were institutional partners in this endeavor.

Despre modernizare și decolonizare la Telciu

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Dacă ne gândim la tematica aleasă pentru această ediție a ”Conferințelor de vară de la Telciu”, cred că cu greu se poate găsi o locație mai potrivită decât acest sat de pe Valea Sălăuței. În acest sens o să înșir câteva argumente care-mi vin degrabă în minte. Un prim argument, de ordin istoric, ar fi faptul că Telciu reprezintă una dintre comunele militarizate de către administrația habsburgică în a doua jumătate a secolului al XVIII-lea. Iar acest proces de militarizare a văii Someșului a avut o importantă dimensiune colonizatoare, în sensul transformării ”bunilor sălbatici” de la periferia estică a monarhiei, în cetățeni loiali și utili Imperiului Habsburgic. Urmele acestui proces se pot vedea atât în păstrarea vechiului slogan grăniceresc ”Virtus Romana Rediviva” în simbolistica liceului ”George Coșbuc” de la Năsăud (înființat în 1864, după desfințarea regimentului grăniceresc), cât mai ales în mândria locală și în aerele de superioritate ale multor năsăudeni, detectabile în numeroase narațiuni care vor să etaleze identitatea locală.

Pe de altă parte, ”necesitatea modernizării și civilizării lumii rurale” reprezintă una dintre temele majore care bântuie de vreo două sute de ani cultura română și imaginarul politic, marcat de complexul periferiei, al românilor. Așa că poate fi considerată o idee de bun simț să discuți problemele modernizării, colonizării și decolonizării tocmai la periferia periferiei, pentru că cum altfel ar putea fi descrisă lumea rurală în raport cu centrele urbane, decât o periferie internă? Un argument conex acestei idei îl reprezintă necesitatea decentralizării culturii, aspect asumat de ”Conferințele de vară de la Telciu” încă de la bun început, când nu prea aveam habar despre decolonizare dar constatasem obositoarea și tot mai stearpa hegemonie a marilor centre culturale și universitare autohtone. Prin urmare, consider că sunt suficiente argumente de ordin teoretic și ideologic pentru a justifica atât tematica, cât și alegerea locației pentru acest eveniment, dincolo de argumentele de ordin pragmatic (precum obținerea sprijinului financiar) sau emoționale, autobiografice. Tematica decolonizării  poate fi privită și ca o destinație finală la care a ajuns acest proiect cultural după căutări timide și entuziaste, concretizate în cele trei ediții anterioare. Și când vorbesc de destinație finală, mă refer la dorința de a face din trio-ul modernizare-decolonizare-lume rurală fundamentul edițiilor viitoare. Dar despre această ambiție, o să detaliez cu altă ocazie.

Ediția din acest an reunește la umbra fagilor, clăilor și caselor Barbie (predominat portocalii și verde strident) ale Telciului universitari și cercetători din multe colțuri ale Europei și ale României, iar după titlurile propuse se poate considera că se întrunesc premisele necesare unor dezbateri și discuții strașnice. Toți cei interesați de acest subiect, sau pur și simplu curioși, sunt bineveniți să participle la lucrările care vor avea loc la Telciu și Bistrița în 24 și 25 iulie anul curent. Ca și în anii trecuți, sala de conferințe a Primăriei Telciu găzduiește prima zi de comunicări și dezbateri, iar gazda zilei următoare este Biblioteca Județeană ”George Coșbuc” din Bistrița, recent cooptată în acest proiect. Pentru informații sau detalii legate de acest eveniment, vă stau la dispoziție la adresa de e-mail: valer_cosma@yahoo.com sau pe pagina de facebook a evenimentului. A mai rămas o săptămână.

Beyond East and West. Decolonizing Modernization: Program

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Thursday/Joi, 23. 07. 2015

20:30 – Dinner at a local restaurant in Telciu/Cină la un restaurant local în Telciu

Friday/Vineri, 24. 07. 2015

Conference room of the City Hall from Telciu/Sala de Conferinţe a Primăriei Comunei Telciu

8:45 – The Morning Coffee /Cafeaua de dimineață

9:15A few welcoming words/ Scurt Cuvânt de bun venitSever Mureșan (mayor Telciu), Manuela Boatcă (organizer) și Valer Simion Cosma (organizer)

9:15 – A few welcoming words from Babeș-Bolyai University/Scurt cuvânt de bun venit din partea Universității Babeș-Bolyai – Toader Nicoară (director of Doctoral School ”History, Culture and Civilization” at Babeș-Bolyai University.

1st Session/Sesiunea I-a: Geopolitics of Decolonization/Geopolitici ale Decolonizării

Chair/Prezidează: Manuela Boatcă and Remus Câmpeanu

9:30 Mauro Elli, Centre for Foreign Policy and Public Opinion Studies of State University of Milan, Italy – Nuclear Modernity in Post-Colonial Pakistan. The Case of the Karachi Nuclear Power Project, 1954-65/Modernitatea Nucleară în Pakistanul post-colonial. Cazul Proiectului Karachi Nuclear Power, 1954-65.

10:00Emilio Cocco, University of Teramo, Italy – Modernizing a Maritime Frontier. Symbolic Exchanges, Terrestrial Conversions and Nation-state building in the Eastern Adriatic/Modernizând o frontieră maritimă. Schimburi simbolice, conversii terestre și construirea statului-națiune în estul Adriaticii.

10:30 – Norbert Petrovici, Faculty of Sociology and Social Work, Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj, Romania  – Framing Criticism and Knowledge Production in Semi-peripheries: Post-socialism Unpacked/Forme de critică și producție de cunoaștere în semi-periferii: postsocialismul chestionat.

11:00 – Coffee break/Pauză de cafea.

11:15 Alfredo Canavero/Lorenzo Meli, State University of Milan, Milano, Italy – European Integration and Decolonization/Integrarea Europeană și Decolonizarea.

12:45Emanuel Copilaș, Faculty of Political Sciences, Philosophy and Communication Sciences, West University, Timișoara, Romania – National-communism for Export: Ceaușescu’s Romania, the Third World and the ‘New World Order’/Național-comunismul ca produs de export: România lui Ceaușescu, Lumea a Treia și „Noua Ordine Mondială”.

12:15Ali Abdelhafiz Moursi, Faculty of Arts, Assiut University, New Valley, Egypt – New Religion of Modernity. Muslims between Holy Privacy and necessities of times/Noua Religie a Modernității. Musulmanii între dogmă și necesitățile timpului.

12:45 – Conclusions/Concluzii

13:15 – Lunch/Prânzul

2nd Session/Sesiunea a II-a: Forging Identities: Orientalist, nationalist, and racist imaginaries/ Construind Identități: Imaginare orientaliste, naționaliste și rasiste

 

Chair/Prezidează: Alina Branda and Ovidiu Țichindelean

14:30 – Fabiana Dimpflmeier, La Tuscia University, Viterbo, Italy – Maritime Perspective on Otherness. Deconstructing Italian Modernization and Identity in Late Nineteenth Century/Perspective maritime asupra diferenței. Deconstruind modernizarea și identitatea italiene la sfârșitul secolului al XIX-lea.

15:00 – Daniela Duca, Romanian Cultural Institute from Berlin, Germany –  Eastern Words vs. Western Words. The Redemption of Balcanisms in Romanian Literature/Cuvinte Estice vs. Cuvinte Vestice. Reînvierea balcanismelor în literatura română.

15:30 Cristian Boboescu, Faculty of History and Philosophy, Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj, Romania – Thule and Thelema: cultural repression and local colonialism/ Thule si Thelema: refulare în cultură și autocolonizare.

16:00 – Coffee break/Pauză de cafea

16:15 Veda Popovici/Ovid Pop, National University of Art, Bucharest, Romania/ Berufsförderungsinstitut, Vienna, Austria – The Postponed Belonging. A short history of the awareness of the periphery and the desire for Europe in the national Romanian construct/Apartenența amânată. O scurtă istorie a conștiinței periferiei și dorința pentru Europa în constructul național românesc.

16:45 Raoul Weiss, Independent Researcher, Strasbourg, France/Cluj, Romania – Symbolic scapegoating of Gypsies as the “dark side” of R(r)oma(nian) reality/„Țiganul” ca țapul ispășitor simbolic în dialogul colonie-metropolă, sau “latura întunecată„ a realității sociale din R(r)omânia.

17:15Pavel Baloun, Faculty of Humanities, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic – Civilizing the Gypsy Child”: “Gypsy School” as a Colonial Practice in Interwar Czechoslovakia (1918-1938)/ ”Civilizând copilul «țigan»”: ”Școala Țigănească” ca practică colonial în Cehoslovacia interbelică (1918-1938).

 

17:45Keynote: Ovidiu Țichindelean, Ideea Arts+Society, Ideea Publishing House, Cluj-Napoca, România – A Case for Decolonial Romania and Europe/Pledoarie pentru o Românie și o Europă decoloniale.

18:15 – Conclusions/Concluzii

20:00 – Dinner/Cina

Saturday/Sâmbătă 25. 07. 2015

Conference room of the ”George Coșbuc” County Library in Bistrița/Sala de conferințe a Bibliotecii Județene ”George Coșbuc” din Bistrița

8:00Travel to Bistrița/Deplasare la Bistrița

9:00 – Morning coffee/Cafeaua de dimineață

9:15A few welcoming words/ Scurt Cuvânt de bun venit: Ioan Pintea (director of the ”George Coșbuc” County Library)

3rd Session/Sesiunea a III-a: Colonial Knowledges and Complicit Disciplines/Cunoștințe coloniale și discipline complice

 

Chair/Prezidează: Edit Szegedi and Emanuel Copilaș

9:30 Alina Branda, Faculty of European Studies, Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj, Romania – Beyond East and West. Anthropology as Intercultural Dialogue/Dincolo de Est și Vest. Antropologia ca Dialog Intercultural.

10:00 Filip Herza, Faculty of Humanities, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic  – Orientalism and the Discourses of Modernization: Czech Anthropology in Subcarpathian Ruthenia (1919-1938)/Orientalismul și Discursurile Modernizării: Antropologia cehă în Ruthenia Subjcarpatică (1919-1938).

10:30 Redi Koobak, Linköping University, Sweden – Transversal Dialogues in Transnational Feminist Theorizing: Intersections of Postcolonial and Post socialist Analytics/ Dialoguri transversale în teoretizarea feministă transnațională: Intersectări ale nalizelor post-coloniale și post-socialiste.

11:00 – Coffee break/Pauză de cafea.

11:15 Remus Câmpeanu, Romanian Academy -”George Barițiu” Institute of History, Cluj, Romania  – Colonization, Myths and the Glorious Story about United States/Colonizare, Mit și Glorioasa Poveste despre Statele Unite.

11:45 Dávid Petrut, Mureș County Museum, Târgu-Mureș, Romania – Dialogue of the empires. Imperial thought and the research concerning Roman Dacia during the time of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy (18671918)/Dialogul Imperiilor. Interferențe ideologice în cercetarea Daciei Romane în perioada monarhiei Austro-Ungare (1867-1918).

12:15Iovan Drehe, Romanian Academy Iași, Romania – On ‘philosophical colonialism’/Despre „colonialismul filosofic”.

12:45 – Conclusions/Concluzii

13:15 – Lunch/Prânzul

4th Session/Sesiunea a IV-a: Modernization and (De)Colonial Ambivalences/Modernizare și ambivalențe (de)coloniale

Chair/Prezidează: Daniela Duca and Valer Simion Cosma

 

14:30Alyosxa Tudor, Center for Gender Studies, SOAS, University of London, United Kingdom – Transgender nationalism, diaspora nationalism:  different dimensions of transnationalism dis/entangled/ Naționalismul transgender, naționalismul diasporei: clarificări ale unor dimensiuni ale transnaționalismului.

15:00 Edit Szegedi, Faculty of European Studies, Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj, Romania – The forgotten city/Orașul uitat.

15:30 Sorin Mitulescu, South-East University ”The Light”, Bucharest, Romania – Recapture of north of the Danube Turkish cities : decolonization and violence./ Recucerirea cetăţilor turceşti de la nord de Dunăre: decolonizare şi violenţă.

16:00– Coffee break/Pauză de cafea

16:15 Carole Chapin, Paris 3 Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris, France Perception in Western Europe as an influence on education and cultural choices: the case of Russian nobility during the second half of 18th century/Percepția în Europa Occidentală ca influență asupra educației și alegerilor culturale: cazul nobilimii ruse în a doua jumătate a secolului al XVIII-lea.

16:45David Schwartz, Gazeta de Artă Politică, Faculty of Theatre and Television, Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj, RomaniaDepictions of the Socialist Past in Post-1989 Romanian Theatre: From “How to Explain the History of Communism to Mental Patients” to “Under Ground: The Jiu Valley after 1989”/Reprezentări ale perioadei socialiste în teatrul românesc post-1989: De la „Istoria comunismului povestită pentru bolnavii mintal” la „SubPământ. Valea Jiului după 1989”.

17:15Alexander De Tey, Independent Researcher, Berlin, Germany – Colonising and decolonising tendencies in ”Rameau á la Turque”/Tendințe colonizatoare și decolonizatoare în ”Rameau á la Turque”.

17:45 – Conclusions/Concluzii

18:00István Szakáts, AltArt, Cluj-Napoca, România: Cultural Capital, East of West. Summary of a project/Capitala Culturală la Est de Vest. Scurtă prezentare a unui proiect

18:30 – Back to Telciu/Înapoi spre Telciu

20:00 – Dinner/Cina

Organizing Committee/Comitet organizatoric:

Valer Simion Cosma, Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

Manuela Boatcă, Freie University, Berlin (Germany)

Ali Abdelhafiz Moursi, Assiut University, New Valley (Egypt)

Eveniment finanțat de Primăria și Consiliul Local ale comunei Telciu.

Parteneri: Biblioteca Județeană ”George Coșbuc” (Bistrița-Năsăud)

Facultatea de Istorie și Filosofie, Universitatea Babeș-Bolyai

Seminarul de Antropologie Istorică

Funded by Telciu City Hall and Telciu City Council

Partners: ”George Coșbuc” Bistrița-Năsăud County Library

                  Faculty of History and Philosophy, Babeș-Bolyai University

                  Seminar for Historical Anthropology

 

Beyond East and West. Decolonizing Modernization – Accepted Papers

Telciu Summer Conferences, 4th edition, 24-25 of July 2015

Telciu-Bistrița, Bistrița-Năsăud County, Romania

 poza 3After a long process of selection,  we finally are able to present the list of the accepted papers for the 4th edition of ”Telciu Summer Conferences”.  At the beginnig of June, we will launch the program of the conference that will be held in Telciu and Bistrița in the 24 and 25 of July 2015. Thanks to all who applied.

For any information about this conference please contact us at the following mail addresses:

valer_cosma@yahoo.commboatca@zedat.fu-berlin.de,  or on the facebook page of our event.

  1. Pavel Baloun, Faculty of Humanities, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic – Civilizing the Gypsy Child”: “Gypsy School” as a Colonial Practice in Interwar Czechoslovakia (1918-1938).
  2. Alina Branda, Faculty of European Studies, Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj, Romania – Beyond East and West. Anthropology as Intercultural Dialogue.
  3. Alfredo Canavero/Lorenzo Meli, State University of Milan, Milano, Italy – European Integration and Decolonization.
  4. Remus Câmpeanu, Romanian Academy – ”George Barițiu” Institute of History, Cluj, Romania – Colonization, Myths and the Glorious Story about United States.
  5. Carole Chapin, Paris 3 Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris, France Perception in Western Europe as an influence on education and cultural choices: the case of Russian nobility during the second half of 18th
  6. Emilio Cocco, University of Teramo, Italy – Modernizing a Maritime Frontier. Symbolic Exchanges, Terrestrial Conversions and Nation-state building in the Eastern Adriatic.
  7. Emanuel Copilaș, Faculty of Political Sciences, Philosophy and Communication Sciences, West University, Timișoara, Romania – National-communism for export: Ceaușescu’s Romania, the Third World and the ‘new world order’.
  8. Fabiana Dimpflmeier, La Tuscia University, Viterbo, Italy – Maritime Perspective on Otherness. Deconstructing Italian Modernization and Identity in Late Nineteenth Century.
  9. Iovan Drehe, Romanian Academy Iași, Romania – On ‘philosophical colonialism’.
  10. Daniela Duca, Romanian Cultural Institute from Berlin, Germany – Eastern Words vs. Western Words. The Redemption of Balcanisms in Romanian Literature.
  11. Mauro Elli, Centre for Foreign Policy and Public Opinion Studies of State University of Milan, Italy – Nuclear Modernity in Post-Colonial Pakistan. The Case of the Karachi Nuclear Power Project, 1954-65.
  12. Filip Herza, Faculty of Humanities, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic – Orientalism and the Discourses of Modernization: Czech Anthropology in Subcarpathian Ruthenia (1919-1938).
  13. Redi Koobak, Linköping University, Sweden – Transversal Dialogues in Transnational Feminist Theorizing: Intersections of Postcolonial and Postsocialist Analytics.
  14. Sorin Mitulescu, South-East University ”The Light”, Bucharest, Romania – Recapture of north of the Danube Turkish cities : decolonization and violence.
  15. Ali Abdelhafiz Moursi, Faculty of Arts, Assiut University, New Valley, Egypt – New Religion of Modernity. Muslims between Holy Privacy and necessities of times.
  16. Rita Paolini, Centre for Foreign Policy and Public Opinion Studies of State University of Milan, Italy – Flirting and fighting Indian princely states and the national movement. Modernity and tradition, localism and centralism in 1930s’ India.
  17. Dávid Petrut, Mureș County Museum, Târgu-Mureș, Romania – Dialogue of the empires. Imperial thought and the research concerning Roman Dacia during the time of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy (18671918).
  18. Veda Popovici/Ovid Pop, National University of Art, Bucharest, Romania/ Berufsförderungsinstitut, Vienna, Austria – The Postponed Belonging. A short history of the awareness of the periphery and the desire for Europe in the national Romanian construct.
  19. David Schwartz, Faculty of Theatre and Television, Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj, RomaniaDepictions of the Socialist Past in Post-1989 Romanian Theatre: From “How to Explain the History of Communism to Mental Patients” to “Under Ground: The Jiu Valley after 1989”.
  20. Marian Suciu, Faculty of Letters, Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj, Romania – New Vietnam: About the long way of transformation from a colony into an independent state.
  21. Edit Szegedi, Faculty of European Studies, Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj, Romania – The forgotten city.
  22. Alexander De Tey, Independent Researcher, Berlin, Germany – Colonising and decolonising tendencies in Rameau á la Turque.
  23. Alyosxa Tudor, Center for Gender Studies, SOAS, University of London, United Kingdom – Transgender nationalism, diaspora nationalism:  different dimensions of transnationalism dis/entangled.
  24. Raoul Weiss, Independent Researcher, Strasbourg, France/Cluj, Romania – Symbolic scapegoating of Gypsies as the “dark side” of R(r)oma(nian) reality.

Organizing Committee:

Valer Simion Cosma, Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

Manuela Boatcă, Freie University, Berlin (Germany)

Ali Abdelhafiz Moursi, Assiut University, New Valley (Egypt)

This conference is funded by Telciu City Hall and Telciu City Council.

Partners: ”George Coșbuc” Bistrița-Năsăud County Library, Faculty of History and Philosophy (Babeș-Bolyai University), Seminar of Historical Anthropology (Babeș-Bolyai University) and Liga Oamenilor de Cultură Bonțideni.